Local News for Friday 8th February 2019

ACTION NEEDED NOW TO KEEP FREE TV LICENCES FOR OVER 75’s

Highlands & Islands Regional MSP Rhoda Grant is seeking a review of Government plan to cut free TV Licences for over 75’s
Rhoda Grant said ACTION NEEDED NOW TO KEEP FREE TV LICENCES FOR OVER 75’s

Highlands & Islands Regional MSP Rhoda Grant is seeking a review of Government plan to cut free TV Licences for over 75’s
Rhoda Grant said ‘The UK Government currently fund free TV Licenses for over-75s, a scheme introduced by the last Labour Government. The Conservative Government has decided to stop funding this scheme at the end of 2020.
The BBC must now decide whether or not they continue the scheme from their own budgets. The cost of providing free licences to the over 75’s will cost in excess of £700miliion.
The BBC Consultation on the future of the scheme will end on 12 February.
Rhoda continued
“The proposals on the table are: 1. - Scrap free licence fees for over-75s. 2. - Replace with a 50% concession for all over-75 households, and 3. - Increase the age threshold for eligibility – Raise threshold to 80 and link free TV licences to over-75s who get pension credit
‘However, I believe that the UK Government should continue funding this scheme, rather than passing the buck to the BBC.
‘TV plays a very important part in the lives of the elderly who rely on it to keep up to date with local and world events, plus having the TV available helps with loneliness and isolation when people are house bound. The over 75’s have paid their taxes all their lives. Is it too much to ask that they get free TV licenses?’
Rhoda has written to the Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport asking them to seriously review this decision.

 

NEW FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS AFOOT FOR SCOTTISH HOMES

All domestic properties are to have smoke, heat and carbon monoxide alarms
New rules to reduce deaths in household fires have been announced with improved standards introduced for fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes.
The improved standards will mean every home in the country must have a smoke alarm fitted in the living room or lounge, and in circulation spaces such as hallways and landings.
The changes also mean every kitchen must have a heat alarm, and the alarms will have to be interlinked so they can be heard throughout the property. There must also be a carbon monoxide alarm where there are fixed combustion appliances.
The new rules mean the standard which currently applies to private rented property and new-builds is being extended to all homes in Scotland.
The regulations come after a consultation carried out following the tragic events at Grenfell Tower in London in June 2017.
Housing Minister Kevin Stewart MSP said:
“Although the standards come into force in February 2021 we hope most people will recognise the additional safety benefits and take action sooner.”
It will be responsibility of the home owner or landlord to ensure the new fire and smoke alarm standards are met. Estimated costs are the region of £200, however this will vary according to what is already in place and the type of alarms used.

‘The UK Government currently fund free TV Licenses for over-75s, a scheme introduced by the last Labour Government. The Conservative Government has decided to stop funding this scheme at the end of 2020.
‘The BBC must now decide whether or not they continue the scheme from their own budgets. The cost of providing free licences to the over 75’s will cost in excess of £700miliion.


The BBC Consultation on the future of the scheme will end on 12 February.


Rhoda continued 

ACTION NEEDED NOW TO KEEP FREE TV LICENCES FOR OVER 75’s

Highlands & Islands Regional MSP Rhoda Grant is seeking a review of Government plan to cut free TV Licences for over 75’s
Rhoda Grant said ACTION NEEDED NOW TO KEEP FREE TV LICENCES FOR OVER 75’s

Highlands & Islands Regional MSP Rhoda Grant is seeking a review of Government plan to cut free TV Licences for over 75’s
Rhoda Grant said ‘The UK Government currently fund free TV Licenses for over-75s, a scheme introduced by the last Labour Government. The Conservative Government has decided to stop funding this scheme at the end of 2020.
The BBC must now decide whether or not they continue the scheme from their own budgets. The cost of providing free licences to the over 75’s will cost in excess of £700miliion.
The BBC Consultation on the future of the scheme will end on 12 February.
Rhoda continued
“The proposals on the table are: 1. - Scrap free licence fees for over-75s. 2. - Replace with a 50% concession for all over-75 households, and 3. - Increase the age threshold for eligibility – Raise threshold to 80 and link free TV licences to over-75s who get pension credit
‘However, I believe that the UK Government should continue funding this scheme, rather than passing the buck to the BBC.
‘TV plays a very important part in the lives of the elderly who rely on it to keep up to date with local and world events, plus having the TV available helps with loneliness and isolation when people are house bound. The over 75’s have paid their taxes all their lives. Is it too much to ask that they get free TV licenses?’
Rhoda has written to the Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport asking them to seriously review this decision.

 

NEW FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS AFOOT FOR SCOTTISH HOMES

All domestic properties are to have smoke, heat and carbon monoxide alarms
New rules to reduce deaths in household fires have been announced with improved standards introduced for fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes.
The improved standards will mean every home in the country must have a smoke alarm fitted in the living room or lounge, and in circulation spaces such as hallways and landings.
The changes also mean every kitchen must have a heat alarm, and the alarms will have to be interlinked so they can be heard throughout the property. There must also be a carbon monoxide alarm where there are fixed combustion appliances.
The new rules mean the standard which currently applies to private rented property and new-builds is being extended to all homes in Scotland.
The regulations come after a consultation carried out following the tragic events at Grenfell Tower in London in June 2017.
Housing Minister Kevin Stewart MSP said:
“Although the standards come into force in February 2021 we hope most people will recognise the additional safety benefits and take action sooner.”
It will be responsibility of the home owner or landlord to ensure the new fire and smoke alarm standards are met. Estimated costs are the region of £200, however this will vary according to what is already in place and the type of alarms used.

‘The UK Government currently fund free TV Licenses for over-75s, a scheme introduced by the last Labour Government. The Conservative Government has decided to stop funding this scheme at the end of 2020.
‘The BBC must now decide whether or not they continue the scheme from their own budgets. The cost of providing free licences to the over 75’s will cost in excess of £700miliion.


The BBC Consultation on the future of the scheme will end on 12 February.


Rhoda continued “The proposals on the table are: 1. - Scrap free licence fees for over-75s. 2. - Replace with a 50% concession for all over-75 households, and 3. - Increase the age threshold for eligibility – Raise threshold to 80 and link free TV licences to over-75s who get pension credit
‘However, I believe that the UK Government should continue funding this scheme, rather than passing the buck to the BBC.
‘TV plays a very important part in the lives of the elderly who rely on it to keep up to date with local and world events, plus having the TV available helps with loneliness and isolation when people are house bound. The over 75’s have paid their taxes all their lives. Is it too much to ask that they get free TV licenses?’
Rhoda has written to the Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport asking them to seriously review this decision.

 

NEW FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS AFOOT FOR SCOTTISH HOMES

All domestic properties are to have smoke, heat and carbon monoxide alarms
New rules to reduce deaths in household fires have been announced with improved standards introduced for fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes.
The improved standards will mean every home in the country must have a smoke alarm fitted in the living room or lounge, and in circulation spaces such as hallways and landings.
The changes also mean every kitchen must have a heat alarm, and the alarms will have to be interlinked so they can be heard throughout the property. There must also be a carbon monoxide alarm where there are fixed combustion appliances.
The new rules mean the standard which currently applies to private rented property and new-builds is being extended to all homes in Scotland.
The regulations come after a consultation carried out following the tragic events at Grenfell Tower in London in June 2017.
Housing Minister Kevin Stewart MSP said:
“Although the standards come into force in February 2021 we hope most people will recognise the additional safety benefits and take action sooner.”
It will be responsibility of the home owner or landlord to ensure the new fire and smoke alarm standards are met. Estimated costs are the region of £200, however this will vary according to what is already in place and the type of alarms used.


“The proposals on the table are: 1. - Scrap free licence fees for over-75s. 2. - Replace with a 50% concession for all over-75 households, and 3. - Increase the age threshold for eligibility – Raise threshold to 80 and link free TV licences to over-75s who get pension credit
‘However, I believe that the UK Government should continue funding this scheme, rather than passing the buck to the BBC.
‘TV plays a very important part in the lives of the elderly who rely on it to keep up to date with local and world events, plus having the TV available helps with loneliness and isolation when people are house bound. The over 75’s have paid their taxes all their lives. Is it too much to ask that they get free TV licenses?’
Rhoda has written to the Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport asking them to seriously review this decision.

 

NEW FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS AFOOT FOR SCOTTISH HOMES

All domestic properties are to have smoke, heat and carbon monoxide alarms
New rules to reduce deaths in household fires have been announced with improved standards introduced for fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes.
The improved standards will mean every home in the country must have a smoke alarm fitted in the living room or lounge, and in circulation spaces such as hallways and landings.
The changes also mean every kitchen must have a heat alarm, and the alarms will have to be interlinked so they can be heard throughout the property. There must also be a carbon monoxide alarm where there are fixed combustion appliances.
The new rules mean the standard which currently applies to private rented property and new-builds is being extended to all homes in Scotland.
The regulations come after a consultation carried out following the tragic events at Grenfell Tower in London in June 2017.
Housing Minister Kevin Stewart MSP said:
“Although the standards come into force in February 2021 we hope most people will recognise the additional safety benefits and take action sooner.”
It will be responsibility of the home owner or landlord to ensure the new fire and smoke alarm standards are met. Estimated costs are the region of £200, however this will vary according to what is already in place and the type of alarms used.